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Wildlife in Jim Corbett National Park

 

Jim Corbett National Park has a strong historical background, which can be traced from the early 1800 when its forest were private property of the rulers of the Terhi Garhwal.

Around the 1820's this part of the state was parted to the British Rulers in return of the assistance provided during the Gurkha invasion. The British exploited the timber potential of Corbett National Park forest and mercilessly felled the forests and plant 'TEAK' a precious hardwood, to fulfill the supply for Railway sleepers.

In 1858 the first step towards protection of Corbett National Park forest was initiated by Major Ramseyin form of a comprehensive plan, wherein farming and cattle intrusion were banned in the lower Patlidun valley. The Forest Department took control of the area and declared it as Reserve forest in 1879 under the forest act. Soon after the condition of these forest showed improvement and possibilities of forming a game sanctuary were proposed in the early 1900 by Michael Keen an officer with the Forest Dept. The proposal was turned down by the then Governor of The United Province John Hewett. More futile attempts were made in the 1916 & 1917 by E.R. Stevens and Smythies, both DFO's of the area to declare the sanctuary but were turned down.

In 1934 Governor Malcolm Hailey supported the proposal and declared the reserve forest into a sanctuary. Soon after Governor Hailey and Sir Smythies proposed the up gradation of the sanctuary to a national park. During this period Major James E Corbett was getting famous for his Man eating Tiger shoots. Corbett, who was well versed with area was consulted and helped in marking the boundaries for the proposed national park. On August 6th 1936, the UP national park act was enacted and Hailey National Park - named after Governor Hailey, came into being as India's first National Park and the worlds third covering an area of about 325 sq. kms.

Post independence the park was renamed after the Ramganga River - the main perennial lifeline of the area and was called the Ramganga National Park. James E Corbett died on 19th April 1955 in Nyeri, Kenya. In 1957 the park was again renamed, in honor of the legendary hunter turned conversationalist, Jim Corbett who spent most his life in the area and helped in setting up the park.
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